27 Countries!

We just did a tally. Amazing to think of it, isn’t it?

27 Countries represented in the John E. Marlow Guitar Series over the past 22 years ( 6 concerts per year):

54 concerts representing the USA

14 Brasil

19 Spain

9 Paraguay

1 Argentina

3 Venezuela

2 Bulgaria

7 France

6 Cuba

4 UK

5 Australia

2 Greece

2 Belgium

1 Sardinia

2 Scotland

1 Germany

4 Ireland

2 Italy

7 Croatia

1 Canada

3 Israel

1 Turkey

3 Chile

3 China

1 Mexico

2 Poland

1 Taiwan

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Review: Marcin Dylla, Classical Guitarist from Poland

Dear Friends,

Here is the Washington Post Review: Marcin Dylla, Classical Guitarist from Poland

Enjoy!

NEW: Marlow Guitar Series Favorites CD

JEMGS_CDPoster2.inddMarlow Guitar Series Favorites CD

“Fresh off the presses and still warm” as they say, the CDs had been delivered to us by their project manager and International Conservatory of Music Board Member Duane Morse just minutes before audience members began to arrive. If you  attended the March 16th, 2013 David Russell concert and wandered by our packed CD & Raffle Ticket table, you may have seen either our poster or the actual Marlow Guitar Series Favorites CD.

Thanks to the help of our volunteers, Debbie and Patrick Mezzetta, who manage the CD & Raffle Ticket table, we made the CDs available to the public for the first time. Many in our audience took advantage of it.

Thanks to our first buyer, who purchased one even before the CDs had arrived at the venue!

The CD features recordings of a selection of artists that have performed for the John E. Marlow Guitar Series over the years. It is a celebration of the wonderful performances that we have had. We are happy to share them with you.

This CD is available for sale at future concerts. We have one left this season, April 13, 2013.

An excerpt from the Introduction inside the booklet: 

Now in its 19th season, the John E. Marlow Guitar Series is the Washington, D.C. area’s premier presenter of the classical guitar in all of its facets.  This CD features some of our favorite performers from the series, with particular emphasis on up-and-coming artists.  All of them have graciously allowed us to include these recordings of their performances to help promote and raise funds to continue the Marlow Guitar Series.   We thank them for their support and ask that you, the listener, respect their generosity by not making or distributing unauthorized copies of this CD or these performances.

Track List:

1.     John Marlow (5:01):  Prelude from Violin Sonata No. 1 (J.S. Bach) (1-22-75)

2.     Ana Vidovic (3:39):  Allegro from Sonatina (Torroba) (11-22-03)

3.     Duo Amaral (4:11):  Suplica from Saggio (Amaral) (1-21-12)

4.     Marco Socias (3:00):  Tonadilla from Three Spanish Pieces (Pujol) (11-10-12)

5.     Guy Van Duser & Billy Novick (5:11):  Wolverine Blues (Morton) (2-24-07)

6.     Frank Vignola (The Frank & Joe Show) (3:24):  Stardust (Carmichael) (5-6-05)

7.     Mark Ashford (5:20):  Capricorn (Dyens) (3-19-11)

8.     Yuri Liberzon (4:04):  Allegro from Sonata Op. 61 (Turina) (2-19-11)

9.     Ricardo Marlow (4:26):  Mi Copita de Jerez (Tanguillo) (1-25-02)

10.  Frank Vignola & Hot Club USA (6:39):  I Can’t Give You Anything But Love (Fields & McHue) (3-16-02)

11.  Pearl Django (2:59):  The Conversation (Leppanen) (4-24-10)*

12.  Margarita Escarpa (4:55):  Tristorosa (Villa-Lobos) (3-28-09)

13.  Carlos Pérez (2:44): Maria Carolina (Lauro) (10-23-10)

14.  Rupert Boyd (4:32):  Torre Bermeja from Piezas Characteristicas (Albeniz) (1-30-10)

15.  Roland Dyens (3:36):  Take the “A” Train (Strayhorn & Ellington) (10-19-02)

16.  George Vassilev (3:59):  Cantabile from Suite for Guitar “Koyunbaba,” Op. 19 (Domeniconi) (11-20-04)

17.  Anabel Montesinos & Marco Tamayo (3:56): The Fool on the Hill (Lennon & McCartney, arr. Brouwer) (11-17-07)

18.  Cem Duruöz (4:54):  Milonga del Angel (Piazzolla) (2-21-09)

*Studio recording

Total running time:  76:34

The John E. Marlow Guitar Series is presented by The International Conservatory of Music, a Section 501(c)(3) organization,
7001 Delaware St. Chevy Chase, MD 20815  www.marlowguitar.org

©℗  2013 The International Conservatory of Music

Review: David Russell, Classical Guitarist from Spain

Dear Friends,

Here is The Washington Post Review: David Russell, Classical Guitarist from Spain

Enjoy!

Review: João Figueirôa, Classical Guitarist from Brazil

Dear Friends,

Here is the link to the Washington Post review of João Figueirôa’s performance last night.

Enjoy!

Ana Vidovic, Croatia, January 26, 2013

Ana Vidovic, Croatia

There was another full house on Saturday, January 26th at the first of the 2013 Marlow Series concerts and Ana Vidovic did not disappoint her attentive audience.

Attendees braved -30 degree temperatures to hear this vibrant talent serenade them with a program that included some of the all time favorites of the classical guitar repertoire. We were fortunate to have Ana back for her third appearance and it was easy to understand how she has claimed international awards such as The Fernando Sor and Francisco Tarrega Competitions when she featured their work on this concert’s list of little jewels. Her selections, too, prove how versatile she is at interpreting a range of styles from Baroque with J.S. Bach’s beautifully mastered BWV 998 to Walton’s Five Bagatelles composed for Julian Bream who commissioned them.

Ana gave us a refreshing order of composers by mixing up the periods a bit so we were not hearing a strict chronology of music. That kind of programming reminds us that, in whichever age an artist composes, fine music is timeless when tested against the backdrop of history.

Ana gave us Turina’s Op. 61 Sonata with its tonally mixed arpeggios, soft, delicate swells, and sensitive, oh so lovely, Andante preceding a rapidly articulated Allegro Vivo. Sor’s Variations on a Theme by Mozart, Op. 9 lightened the evening with sweetly, playful cat-and-mouse like runs chasing each other around the neck of the instrument. Tarrega’s pensive Recuerdos de la Alhambra was freshly conceived and brought the listeners forward as it faded to its pianissimo close. And, Albeniz’ Granada with its wonderful dynamic range followed by Asturias showed us how breathtaking this lady’s pianissimos can be.

The second half of the program began with J.S.Bach’s Prelude, Fugue and Allegro (BWV 998). As much as one can appreciate the mastery of Spanish composers of the guitar, one can never go wrong with the German J.S.B. The man’s a hands-down genius and hearing this piece so capably handled, even when the Allegro could easily run away with the performer, or vice-versa, was worth the evening alone.

Mangore’s La Catedral, a piece I’d never heard, had a nice ring to it with the opening notes sounding like high, bell tones which descend into the middle range of the instrument followed by a spiritually cast Andante, and ending with a terrific Allegro with arpeggios flying over a repeated drone so meticulously executed. Walton’s Five Bagatelles were the final work of the evening and I couldn’t help thinking of Satie’s Gymnopedies in the Lento with the Sempre espressivo’s quiet roaring after it like a locomotive forging on across an open plain.

We certainly do look forward to having Ana back again. There’s a reason why some performers return over the years, and this one demonstrated clearly why she’s a favorite.

Next concert: Saturday, February 16, 2013. Joao Paulo Figueiroa of Brazil. Please join us.

-Deborah Drayer

Silver Spring, MD

Marco Socias, November 10, 2012

“A delight;” one word may mean little if it was mine describing the artistry of Marco Socias.

But it was Joaquin Rodrigo who spoke it. The famous composer’s succinct admiration for his fellow Spanish guitarist was confirmed by a full house audience on November 10th, 2012 at the Westmoreland Congregational United Church of Christ.

Socias’ interpreted a program which demonstrated his mastery of the classical guitar. Having been born in Venezuela,  his encore,  “El Marabino,” (Antonio Lauro) elicited deep emotions from me. All in all, I hope Marco Socias returns in the not too distant future.

Gonzalo T. Palacios, Ph.D.

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